Wednesday, March 11, 2009

You've Never Had It So Good!

Tēnā koutou katoa – Greetings to you allYou've Never Had It SO Good!
When elected British Prime Minister Harold Macmillan uttered these words in 1959, I was 12 years old. He summarised what he thought were future halcyon days for Britain. It didn’t work out so well for Macmillan.

But 50 years later, these same words can be used to describe genuinely a halcyon time for those who wish to learn all about elearning.

Never has there been a time when world leaders in the field of elearning have been so generous with their advice – on all aspects of elearning, from the best available software, both free and commercial, to the best technique in elearning design.

Never has there been a time when so much free debate and ebullient discourse between those experienced in the field of elearning have been so accessible to anyone who has the wherewithal and takes the trouble to access it.

Never has there been a time when virtual festivals of learning have raged so splendidly and so deeply on the intricacies of thought, idea, knowledge, pedagogy and scaffolding on behalf of that favoured being, the elearner.

Never has there been a time when all of this has been so easily accessible in archives that date back ten years and more.

Never has there been a time when a teacher/tutor/instructor/learner could build so easily his or her own online database of information on elearning using the most up-to-date free software to access the Internet.

Bountiful elearning:


From regular blogs on the subject, written by experts on practical tips and tricks, through expert tuition on blogging, on how to use blogs and all the attendant embeds, widgets and devices, and advice on current changes in those, to a 60 minute mini-course on elearning design practice. Chronicles that burst forth cornucopias of up-to-date news-streams on everything that’s happening online, feeds that weld collaboratively the joint thinking and writing of elearning experience from all over the world,
you could read about it all 24/7.

The above ‘fan of links’ (with apologies to Sue Waters) merely skims the surface of the skin of what wonderful fruit is available
online for anyone to enjoy in elearning all that is currently known, available and being developed.

When it comes to finding out and digesting anything to do with elearning, you’ve never had it so good!


Tom Kuhlmann - The Rapid Elearning Blog 50 Practical Tips and Tricks
Skellie -
Skelliewag.org Bloggers: Watch and Learn
Sue Waters -
The Edublogger Have You Re-inserted Your GA Tracking Code?
Clive Shepherd -
60 Minute Masters
Stephen Downes -
Stephen's Web
Browse My Stuff -
Tony Karrer's brainchild Elearning Learning

Ka kite anō – Catch ya later

4 comments:

Bonnie K said...

Hi Ken,
I haven't been here is a while. But when I get to visit I always learn something. So thanks for the links. have been busy with the Slice of Life challenge at Two Writing Teachers.
I'm wondering and hoping there will be another comments challenge in May. Do you know anything about that?
Bonnie

Blogger In Middle-earth said...

Kia ora Bonnie
I haven't picked up anything about a May Comments Challenge this year. I do know there were several spin-offs from last year's Challenge. Web2.0Wednesday was one I took part in.

Sue Waters started a 31 Day Challenge in January this year on improving blogging. I'm not sure what's happened with that recently.

I'll keep my eyes open and let you know if I see one ::-)

Catchya

Anonymous said...

Harold MacMillan said: Let us be frank, most of our people have never had it so good. He said this in 1957 and he was then quoting the US election slogan of 1952: You've never had it so good.

Blogger In Middle-earth said...

Kia ora Anonymous!

I guess, then, Harold MacMillan may well have used that 'quote' several times considering he was Prime Minister from 10 January 1957 to 18 October 1963.

The time I recall him using it was when he announced the 1959 Budget outside No 10 Downing Street, as was the custom at that time. The occasion was recorded and has been screened many times on British TV since then.

Catchya later